Webinar with Joan Green: Learn the basics of using your iPad to help individuals with special needs

September 6, 2012

Friday October 5, 2012 1:00-1:30 EST

During this 30 minute webinar, Joan L. Green M.A. CCC-SLP ( The founder of Innovative Speech Therapy) will introduce you to the many features of the iPad which are helpful for individuals with special needs. She will share some of her top app picks and strategies to help you learn to use the iPad to help children and adults who have a wide variety of communication, cognitive, literacy and learning challenges.

Registering now will save you a seat in the live webinar and entitle you to one copy of the “special report” which will be available on the day of the event . “Seating” is limited.

If all goes according to plan, Joan will record the webinar and then offer a “pay per view” option so that the webinar can be viewed online with the accompanying “special report” to be used for future reference of discussed products and ideas.
$25.00 registration fee

Click Here to Reserve Your Space Now


Two New App Goldmines by Tactus Therapy

September 15, 2011

I spend a great deal of time trying out new Apple apps- and currently have over 900.  It’s hard to believe that iTunes currently features over 425,000 apps. There are very few apps which are created specifically to help adults who have aphasia. Tactus Therapy Solutions has recently released two which are wonderful! I find myself using them daily in therapy with adults as well as children who have a wide variety of language and learning challenges. They are a great extension to traditional speech therapy techniques and make it much easier for families to practice at home with guidance about the most appropriate way to configure the apps. They each cost $24.99 and are well worth it!

   

 Naming TherAppy     

This app is very helpful for children and adults who have word retrieval challenges.

  • The home screen presents four modes: Naming Practice, Describe, Naming Test, and Flashcards.
  • In the upper right corner is the Settings button which will allow you to choose your desired number of trials, the email address to which you want results to be sent, and the Child-Friendly toggle button which takes out pictures that contain alcohol, violence, and adult themes.
  • The upper left corner holds the Info button and contains the basic instructions the user needs in order to use the app. So far I find myself using the “naming practice” mode the most.
  • This app includes over 400 high quality pictured nouns with a flexible cueing hierarchy and optional scoring.
  • The nouns are divided into 10 categories and one or more can be selected for targeted practice.
  • The voice output is a high quality male voice with a neutral accent in slow natural speech to facilitate comprehension.
  • Scoring allows a therapist or partner to indicate when the word is correct or incorrect. The app records which cue was used to get the correct answers and produces a score report for email.

Naming Practice Cueing Hierarchy:

Description: plays a short definition and works as a semantic cue
First Letter: shows the first letter of the target word
Whole Word/Written Word cue: shows the complete written word above the picture
Phrase completion: plays a phrase that the client can complete by supplying the target word
First Sound/Phonemic cue: plays the first sound of the target word
Repetition: plays the entire spoke word for the client to repeat

Describe Cueing Hierarchy
This activity includes over 460 pictures with 4-6 question prompts, with each prompt programmed to be appropriate to the picture currently being shown. The Describe Mode offers questions based on semantic properties such as location, function, smell, color, texture, appearance, shape, size, person, time, sound, taste, sound, category, and association.

Comprehension

TherAppy

I find that I am using Comprehension TherAppy daily with adults and children who have aphasia, auditory processing issues and a variety of attention and cognitive challenges. The pictures and voice are very high quality and there are many ways that this app can be configured to work toward goals. Many nouns are initially includes and expansion packs can be purchased with verbs and adjectives.
There are 3 modes:

  • Listen“: match an auditory stimulus (spoken word) to a picture
  • Read“: match a written stimulus (printed word) to a picture
  • Listen & Read“: match an auditory stimulus (spoken word) to a written word
  • 10 categories of nouns are available  including animals, foods, objects, concepts, places, people, body parts and more. Specific categories can be selected.
  • Users are able to determine the number of photos on the screen (2-6) or the “Auto” feature can be selected to automatically adjust the field size based on performance
  • There are 3 levels of difficulty which adjust the relatedness of foils (semantic and phonemic) to move from Easy to Hard
  • Automatic scoring tracks success and progress on-screen

I look forward to new releases in the near future for Tactus Therapy Solutions. Writing TherAppy will soon be available.

To learn about other ways technology can be used to help adults or children who have a wide range of communication, cognitive, literacy and learning challenges – check out my website at  www.innovativespeech.com, contact me at Joan@innovativespeech.com or buy my newest book titled The Ultimate Guide to Assistive Technology in Special Education which is full of info about computer software, iPad apps and other tools and strategies which are helpful for improving speaking, understanding, reading, writing and thinking  for adults as well as children.


Talking Tom Cat Free App

March 30, 2011

Recently, I have been using this free app all the time during speech therapy sessions with children- very young and older.  Everyone ends up laughing- it’s a great way to entice a reluctant child to participate. They love Tom the cat and often come to our next session asking for it! It is extremely motivating for encouraging children to vocalize, working to improve breath support for speech, and practicing saying sounds. I’ve even had kids who are working on high level language skills try to give the cat directions on how to follow a difficult task and then have the cat repeat back each direction or tell back parts of a story and the child pretends they are the teacher:)

Children can touch the cat  and it purrs. One aspect of the app I did not like is that when children touched it too hard, the cat reacted as if it were being hit and I didn’t want to joke around about that. I was quite pleased to discover in the settings section that that the “violence” feature could be turned off. Users can also change the setting for a longer listening time and record the cat for up to 45 seconds and then post the video on YouTube or send it in an email. Children can also interact with the cat and offer it a drink. Younger ones often respond well when asked to teach the cat to count to 10.  It helps them remember to speak slowly in small chunks.  There are also a few other talking friends available:)

Here is the iTunes link for Apple app…Click Here
Here is the link to download the Droid app.. Click here

To learn more about my new book which highlights apps, software, websites and other cutting-edge technologies Click here